Department of Art & Art History

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Visiting Artists: Dutes Miller & Stan Shellabarger, 2011
Visiting Artists: Dutes Miller & Stan Shellabarger, 2011

Undergraduate Courses

[Those pending approval as permanent courses by the College of A&S are designated by an asterisk (*). Until approved, these courses are taught under Special Topics numbers] PLEASE NOTE THAT THE MAJORITY OF GRADUATE SEMINARS ARE RELATED TO CURRENT FACULTY RESEARCH AND ARE THEREFORE TAUGHT UNDER SPECIAL TOPICS NUMBERS.

1. ARTH 1300-3 World Art Studies 1
Surveys major art styles from the Paleolithic period through the Renaissance, including European, Asian, and the Pre-Columbian/Islamic world. Emphasizes comparison of Western and non-Western visual expressions as evidence of differing cultural orientations. Approved for arts and sciences core and curriculum: literature and the arts.

2. ARTH 1400-3 World Art Studies 2
Surveys major art styles from about 1600 to the present, including Europe, Asia, the Islamic world, the Americas, and tribal arts. Emphasizes comparison of Western and non-Western visual expression as evidence of differing culture orientations. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

3. ARTH 1509-4 Trash and Treasure, Temples and Tombs: Art and Archeology of the Ancient World
Introduces the art and archeology of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome, examining various ancient approaches to power, religion, death, and the human body. Analyzes art, architecture, and everyday trash to learn about ancient humanity. Same as CLAS 1509. Approved for art and sciences core curriculum: historical context or literature and the arts.

4. ARTH 1600-3 Freshman Seminar: Critical Introduction to Art History*
Provides a broad introduction to understanding and appreciating art and art history within a critical lecture, seminar, and discussion format. The focus of this class is a selected topic that will cover relevant historical and critical issues. This course includes visits to the Denver Art Museum and other regional and campus galleries and collections. Sophomores welcome.

5. ARTH 2019-3 Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius
Introduces the towns and villas buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. Explores the layout and decoration of ancient Roman houses, the variety of artifacts uncovered as evidence for daily and the history of the excavations. Same as CLAS 2019. Approved for art and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

6. ARTH 2409-3 Asian Art
Designed for those having no previous experience in the stuffy of Asian art. Traces the development of sculpture, painting, architecture, and the other visual arts of South Asia, the Far East, and Southeast Asia, with a synopsis of developments from 1453 through the 18th-century. Approved for art and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

7. ARTH 3009-3 Critical Thinking in Art History
Through structured discussions, selected readings, and written assignments provides an understanding of how art history has evolved as an academic discipline and how art historians evaluate complex issues of style, form, content, and theory in the visual arts. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

8. ARTH 3029-3 Medieval and Early Modern Visual Culture, A.D. 400-1750
Introduces students to the literature, history, culture and art of Europe and the Mediterranean basin from late antiquity through the early modern period. Interdisciplinary approach to visual culture focuses on uses of sacred religious practices and lay devotion. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400. Credit not granted for this course and FINE 2029.

9. ARTH 3039-3 Greek Art and Archeology
Covers prehistoric Aegean through the 4th-century B.C.E., considering architecture, pottery, painting, sculpture, and personal ornament. Societal customs such as use of space and burial patterns are considered as well as art and its uses, to help understand developments in Greek culture. Credit not granted for this course and FINE/CLAS 1009. Same as CLAS 3039. . Approved for art and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

10. ARTH 3049-3 Introduction to Roman Art and Architecture
Introduces the monuments and sites of the ancient Roman world from the foundation of Rome (753 B.C.E.) to Constantine (306-307 C.E.). Emphasizes the relationship of art, architecture, and artifacts to the political, social, and religious institutions of Italy and the provinces. Same as CLAS 3049. Credit not granted for this course and FINE 1019. Approved for art and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

11. ARTH 3079-3 Medieval Art Survey
Surveys the history of Western art from Constantine to around the year 1300, including Carolingian, Ottonian, Anglo-Saxon, Romanesque, and Gothic. Considers “”Barbarian,”" Byzantine, and Islamic influences. Prereqs., ARTH 1300, 1400.

12. ARTH 3109-3 Art in Contemporary Society
Examines writings by philosophers and art critics as they address the question: What is art for? Readings focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, including current theories and some non-Western theories. Students are encouraged to develop their own responses to the question. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

13. ARTH 3209-3 Art, Culture, and Gender Diversity, 1400-1600: Renaissance Art Out of the Canon
Studies the rising status of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe and how Europeans perceived non-Western art during the early modern period. Introduces history of race/ethnicity, gender, and class concerns embodied in the European category visual arts. Emphasizes new methods for interpreting history without imposing Eurocentric viewpoints. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

14. ARTH 3210-3 Art of Renaissance Cities and Courts*
Lays a foundation for studying humanist culture associated with the modern term “Renaissance Art” from c. 1400-1600, organized by location, artist, and patron. Presents significant works of architecture, painting, and sculpture – including cult images as well as illuminated manuscripts, textiles, curiosity cabinets – from major artistic centers such as Florence, Rome, Venice, Milan, Fontainebleau, and Prague.

15. ARTH 3309-3 European Art, 1300-1800
Covers high visual culture in Europe from 1300 to 1800. Discussions of this concept with its implications for aesthetics, semiotics, and ideology form the core of the course. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

16. ARTH 3419-3 Modernism and the “Death” of the Nineteenth Century
Takes the last Impressionist Exhibition in 1886 as a starting point for modern art. This course observes the “death” of the nineteenth century and the rise of Modernism which in itself comes to a close around 1970. This is a rich and intricate period with a raft of movements and decisive artists. Picasso and Matisse in particular will be studied. Prereq., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

17. ARTH 3509-3 American Art
Surveys American art and material culture from the pre-colonial era to the present day. Considers cultural and artistic interaction, ethnic expressions, patronage, European and non-Western influences, and the struggle to develop a uniquely American artistic identity. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

18. ARTH 3519-3 Modern Architecture, 1780-1960
Introduces the major movements and developments in European and American architecture from Neoclassicism to Postmodernism. Considers the impact of exhibitions, expositions, and vernacular architecture. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400

19. ARTH 3539-3 Contemporary Art
Examines contemporary art and theory in the transition from modern to postmodern expression. Discusses painting, sculpture, installations, performance, video, photography, and architecture with attention to historical context and criticism. Considers neoexpressionist, feminist, minority, political, and public art. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

20. ARTH 3619-3 The Arts of China
Surveys Chinese painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from Neolithic to modern times. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400, or 2409, or HIST 1608.

21. ARTH 3629-3 The Arts of Japan
Offers an appreciation and chronological development of the arts of Japan. Emphasizes the arts of Shintoism and Buddhism as well as the particular Japanese aesthetic from prehistoric times to the present. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

22. ARTN 3719-3 History of Media Arts*
Surveys the development of technological media both as sources of information and as art. Photography and related media, film, video, holography, and electronic imaging systems are surveyed as art and as technologies, emphasizing major artists, movements, exhibitions, and other productions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400. Counts as an elective. Does not fulfill an art history requirement for the BA or BFA.

23. ARTH 3729-3 Foundations in Latin American Art*
Examines Latin America’s cultural pluralism and art production beginning in Pre-Columbian times and following through to the present. Considers the various functions of art as well as the relationship between objects, artists, and the cultures from which they come. Provides students with a broad frame of reference for many historical periods and equips students to evaluate art objects and their cultural contexts.

24. ARTH 3929 (1-3) Special Topics in Art History
May be repeated up to 18 total credit hours when topic varies. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

25. ARTH 4019-3 Art of Ancient Egypt
Surveys the development of Egyptian architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from their beginnings to the establishment of Christianity. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

26. ARTH 4039-3 Byzantine Art
Examines art of the East Christian Empire from the accession of Constantine to the conquest of Constantinople with a synopsis of developments from 1453 through the 18th-century. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

27. ARTH 4069-3 Medieval Manuscripts
Surveys decorated books from late antiquity to the advent of the printing press. Examines the various roles manuscripts played within different medieval communities. Prereq., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

28. ARTH 4089-3 Romanesque and Gothic Art
Examines major artistic trends in Europe between the years 1000 and 1300, a period that witnessed, among others, the development of gothic cathedrals and the rise of the professional artist. Particular attention will be given to exchange with other cultures. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

29. ARTH 4109-3 Ancient Italian Painting
Explores the problems, theories and methods for understanding the iconography, styles, topologies, contexts and techniques of fresco wall painting in ancient Italy from the 6th-century B.C.E. to the 4th-century C.E. Topics covered include Etruscan tomb paintings, late Republican and early imperial fresco paintings from Rome and Campania, and later Roman wall paintings, including the painted images in ancient catacombs. Previous coursework on ancient Italy or the history of pre-modern art is highly recommended. Recommended prereqs., CLAS/ARTH 1509, 3049. Same as CLAS 4109.

30. ARTH 4119-3 Roman Sculpture
Examines ancient Roman sculpture with emphasis on the display, iconography, and production of private and public monuments in the Roman Empire. Explores sculpture as evidence for historical developments, societal and gender attitudes, and state ideologies in the ancient Roman world. Recommended prereqs., ARTH 1300, CLAS or FINE 1019. Same as CLAS 4119.

31. ARTH 4129-3 Aegean Art and Archaeology
Provides a detailed study of the cultures of prehistoric Greece, the Cycladic Islands, and Crete, their art and archaeology, and their history within the broader context of the eastern Mediterranean, from earliest human settlement to the collapse of the Bronze Age at about 1100 B.C.E. Emphasis is on palace states. Same as ANTH/ARTH 4129, CLAS 5129.

32. ARTH 4139-3 Greek Vase Painting
Provides a comprehensive overview of Greek vase painting, from prehistoric through the 4th- century B.C.E. Emphasis is on learning the development of primary decorative styles and on refining skills of visual analysis, scholarly research, critical thinking, oral commentary, and written presentation. Same as CLAS 5139.

33. ARTH 4149-3 Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
Examines Greek architecture in context, from the 9th-century B.C.E. into the Hellenistic period, considering the use of space, both in religious and in civic settings, and using texts as well as material culture. Emphasis is on developing analytical skills. Same as CLAS 4149.

34. ARTH 4169-3 Topics in Ancient and Classical Art and Archaeology
In-depth consideration of an aspect of ancient Mediterranean culture. Topics vary; they may include ancient wall painting, Greek sculpture, artists and patrons, the ancient Near East, Egyptian art and archaeology, or Etruscan art and archaeology. Maybe repeated up to 9 total credit hours providing the topics are different. Same as CLAS 4169.

35. ARTH 4189-3 Medieval Art
Focuses on one area of medieval art. Topics vary, but may include Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, or Gothic art. Emphasizes critical thinking, methods of scholarly research, and development of writing skills. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

36. ARTH 4199-3 Roman Architecture
Examines the designs, functions, and construction methods of ancient Roman towns, temples, baths, houses, and civic structures, as well as utilitarian structures including roads and aqueducts. Emphasizes Roman architectural forms and spaces as vehicles for political propaganda and empire consolidation. Same as CLAS 4199.

37. ARTH 4209-3 Classical Archaeological Field Methods
Offers experiential learning in theories and methods of field excavation at the Villa of Maxentius in Rome. Applies methods for stratigraphic excavation, electronic surveying with Gis, ceramic analysis, numismatic analysis, architectural construction materials and methods, artifact conservation and data processing and documentation. Offered abroad only. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Coreq., ARTH 4219 for first 3 credit hours. Recommended prereqs., CLAS/ARTH 1509, 3049. Same as CLAS 4209 and 5209.

38. ARTH 4219-3 Maxentius and the City of Rome
Combines seminar discussion and site visits in Rome and Tivoli to understand the excavations at the Villa of Maxentius and its artifacts in the broader contexts of Roman architectural development, late Roman art, and late imperial Roman history. Offered abroad only. Must be taken concurrently with CLAS/ARTH 4209 or CLAS 5209. Recommended prereqs., CLAS/ARTH 1509, 3049. Same as CLAS 4219.

39. ARTH 4269-3 Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Examines civilizations of the Iran-Iraq region from the rise of urbanism in Mesopotamia through the era of the first ‘world empire,’ Achaemenid Persia. Emphasizes the material record of religious and state institutions of the ancient Near East, especially monuments that illustrate concepts of kingship. Explores notions of style, symbolism, visual rhetoric, text-image synthesis, patronage, creativity, and roles of artists. Recommended prereq., CLAS/ARTH 1509. Same as CLAS 4269. Approved for arts and science core curriculum: human diversity.

40. ARTH 4279-3 Michelangelo, 1475-1564
Focuses on Michelangelo’s long career, marked by outstanding achievements in sculpture, painting, architecture, and poetry. Emphasizes his projects and achievements in light of 16th-century artistic theory, including relationships to his contemporaries in the arts and literature. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

41. ARTH 4289-3 Michelangelo in situ: Rome and Florence*
Standing before Michelangelo in Rome and Florence offers a unique opportunity. Our approach will be chronological with two weeks in Rome and one week in Florence. To see and feel the works themselves, to respond to their color, and to study their details is a learning experience that can only be done in situ. Offered only through the Study Abroad program.

42. ARTH 4309-3 Neoclassicism and Romanticism, 1760-1840
Surveys painting and sculpture in England and France from the last quarter of the 18th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

43. ARTH 4319-3 European Art, 1830-1886
Surveys the major movements in painting in France and England from the Revolution of 1830 to the impressionist crisis of 1886. Emphasizes and discusses painting and major expressions in sculpture and architecture.

44. ARTH 4329-3 Modern Art 1
Provides an in-depth study of the fin de siècle, stressing postimpressionism, art nouveau, and symbolism. Concludes with fauvism in France and the expressionist movement in Germany. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

45. ARTH 4339-3 Modern Art 2
Begins with early Picasso and cubism, including analytic and synthetic cubism and emphasizing the various isms of the 20th-century. Also studies Italian futurism, de Stijl and the Bauhaus, dada, and surrealism. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

46. ARTH 4359-3 Modern Sculpture, 1870–1970
Examines outstanding sculptors in Europe and America from Rodin to the present. Emphasizes American sculpture since World War II. Prereq., one 3000-level art history art history course.

47. ARTH 4419-3 The Arts of Colonial Mexico and Peru*
Examines important works, artists, and themes that comprise artistic production of colonial Latin America. Focuses on the intermingling, convergence, and at times, clash of European, Amerindian, and African cultures, which established the foundation of Latin America’s pluralism.

48. ARTH 4449-3 Arts of India and Southeast Asia
Surveys the architecture, sculpture, and painting of India and those areas of Southeast Asia influenced by India from the period of Mohenjo Daro and Harappa to recent times. Includes the Himalayan region and Tantric art in general. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

49. ARTH 4459-3 Pre-Columbian Art of Mesoamerica
Introduces students to the art, architecture, and cultures of Mesoamerica – a region that encompasses modern-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and parts of El Salvador, and Honduras. Focuses on major Pre-Columbian art objects and monuments to learn about the societies and cultures from which they came. Also considers the various roles that the visual arts and architecture played in these societies. Covers Olmec through Aztec civilizations.

50. ARTH 4469-3 Chinese Painting
Surveys the history of Chinese painting, with special emphasis on major masters and monuments, the history of styles, and Chinese theories on the art of painting. Focuses on Chinese painters, their lives, and art as representatives of China’s artistic heritage. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

51. ARTH 4489-3 History of Japanese Prints and Their Impact on Modern Art
Surveys printmaking in Japan from its introduction to the present. Examines pre-Modern and Modern Japanese art and culture reflected in prints. Explores ukiyo, “”The floating world,”" and its impact on modern artists in Europe and America. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course. Recommended prereq., ARTH 3629.

52. ARTH 4559-3 Twentieth-Century Architecture
Examines the major movements and development in European and American architecture, 1900-1960′s. Considers the major styles, as well as cultural interactions, race/ethnicity, gender and class concerns as they relate to both the practice and profession of architecture. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

53. ARTH 4569-3 United States Architecture
Examines architecture as it developed in the area now defined as the continental United States from early cultures to the present. Considers the major styles and issues of cultural interaction, race/ethnicity, gender and class concerns as they relate to the practice, theory, and profession of architecture. Prereq., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

ARTH 4659-3 Visualizing War: From Goya to Today*
Introduces artworks that respond to global conflicts in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics involve all media and a broad range of artistic approaches: activism, war photography, political painting, sculpture, print and drawing portfolios, memorials, installations, video games. The seminal works of Goya, Otto Dix, and Picasso serve as references for more recent and current works. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar for art history majors.

ARTH 4599-3 Contemporary Architecture*
Examines the history and theory of contemporary architecture. In the field of architecture, history and theory differ in that the former describes and analyzes past work, while theory offers alternative solutions or new strategies for approaching the discipline. Both of these components are key to understanding contemporary architecture, and this course will work between the two modes of understanding.

ARTH 4609-3 Critical Issues in Photography*
Examines the history and theory of photography and the relationship of photography to the other arts, as well as to literary, political, social, and philosophical issues. Analyzes the critical issues that inform photography through the writings of critics, historians, and photographers using both thematic and chronological approaches.

ARTH 4629-3 Degas Seminar
Introduces current Degas studies and research by drawing upon recent books, exhibition catalogues, and scholarly journal articles. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar required for art history majors.

ARTH 4639-3 Manet Seminar
Introduces current Manet studies and research by drawing upon recent books, exhibition catalogues, and scholarly journal articles. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar required for art history majors.

ARTH 4649-3 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
Fosters the creative study of the background of modern art. Considers 19th-century European painting and, to a lesser degree, sculpture, in relation to social, cultural, and political history form 1863 to 1900. Focuses on France, but gives attention to other countries as well.

ARTH 4659-3 Visualizing War Seminar: From Goya to Today*Introduces artworks that respond to global conflicts in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics involve all media and a broad range of artistic approaches: activism, war photography, political painting, sculpture, print and drawing portfolios, memorials, installations, video games. The seminal works of Goya, Otto Dix, and Picasso serve as references for more recent and current works. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar for art history majors.

ARTH 4669-3 Romanticism and Realism*
Fosters the study of the background of modern art. Considers 19th-century European, and to a lesser degree, American painting and sculpture in relation to social, cultures, and political history from 1789 (the French Revolution) to 1863 (the Salon des refuses). Focuses on France, but gives attention to other countries as well.

ARTH 4679-3 Romanticism Seminar*
Introduces current Romanticism studies and research methods by drawing upon recent books, exhibition catalogues, and scholarly journal articles. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar for art history majors.

ARTH 4689-3 Post-Impressionism Seminar*
Introduces current Post-Impressionism studies and research methods by drawing upon recent books, exhibition catalogues, and scholarly journal articles. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar for art history majors.

ARTH 4699-3 The Idea of Art Seminar*
Studies contemporary critiques of historical ideas about the twin institutions of the university and the museum and the role of art history in the cultural mission of both. Explores fundamental questions about the role of art in society through weekly discussion of readings, a class presentation, and final research paper. Fulfills requirements for ARTH 4919 capstone seminar required for art history majors.

ARTH 4739-3 The Intellectual Roots of Italian Renaissance Art
Studies critical issues raised in the literature on art, focusing on Renaissance interpretations of key historical themes such as imitation and decorum. Carefully examines the language used in primary sources (available in English). Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

ARTH 4749-3 Italian Renaissance Art: Studies in the Exchange between Theory and Practice
Addresses how artists developed new compositional procedures, graphic techniques, and audiences, and how these procedures were theorized in an age when artists’ intellectual and social status rose dramatically. Explores reception of new graphic technology. Studies specific commissions and primary texts in depth. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course.

ARTH 4759-3 17th Century Art and the Concept of the Baroque
Surveys 17th-century European painting, sculpture, and architecture, along with a critical study of artistic theory, artistic institutions (such as the Academia di San Luca and the Academie Royal), and the concept of the term baroque. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

ARTH 4769-3 Gender Studies in Early Modern Visual Culture
Examines 15th and 16th-century European ideas about women from a variety of feminist perspectives. Focuses on recent contributions to history of women as they intersect with the visual arts. Prereq., one 3000-level art history course. Same as WMST 4769. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

ARTH 4779-3 Multicultural Perspectives on New Mexican Santos
Reflects upon the question: In what sense were the regional variants of European devotional images the effects of meaningful cultural interaction? Evidence considered includes oral traditions, pueblo pottery, and painting, emphasizing interpretations that respect rights of communities to maintain privacy. Prereqs., ARTH 1300, 1400, and one 3000-level art history course.

ARTN 4819-3 Contemporary Chicano Art*
Examines Chicano art world, focusing on contemporary scene. Lecture/discussion/dialogue explored through readings and visual presentations including: video, guest lecturers, and visits to local spaces. Prereq., any 3000-level art history course or instructor consent. Counts as an elective. Does not fulfill an art history requirement for the BA or BFA.

ARTH 4909 (1-3) Independent Study-Art History
May be repeated up to 7 total credit hours.

ARTH 4919-3 Undergraduate Seminar: Selected Topics in Art History
Seminar course dealing with selected areas or problems within the history of art. Consult current online Schedule Planner for seminar topic. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., instructor consent.

ARTH 4929 (1-3) Special Topics in Art History
May be repeated up to 18 total credit hours when topic varies.

ARTH 4939 (3-6) Art Museum Internship
Focuses on opportunities at the Denver Art Museum, working with individual curators and master teachers in selected areas, such as audience interpretation, interpretive research files, and public school curriculums. Introduces students to the professional culture and activities of art museums. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereqs., ARTH 1300 and 1400.

ARTH 4959-3 Art History Honors Thesis
May be elected during the final semester. Consists of a substantial, original written thesis. Requires faculty sponsorship. Does not guarantee a student will receive honors. Same as FINE 4008.