Department of Art & Art History

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Faculty Exhibition: Deborah Haynes
Faculty Exhibition: Deborah Haynes

Art History

Arielle Myers

Art History, MA, 2016

Focusing on contemporary art in Eastern Europe, specifically from the South Slavic region, my research explores the ways in which artists negotiate the politics of memory, confession, innocence and victimhood in their work. I am interested in the strategies that artists from this region employ to forge new identities following the fall of socialist government and the 1992-1995 Wars of Secession. In this case, art often serves a generative function- aiding in the construction of new, more inclusive national narratives by allowing artists and publics to perform memory and process trauma through the recalling of experiences before, during, and after the war. I have previously written on artworks that respond to gendered nationalisms and gendered violence in the Yugoslavian Wars of Secession, such as Jenny Holzer’s Lustmord series (1993-1996) and Maja Bajević’s Women at Work series (1999-2001). My master’s thesis will expound on the relation of conflict and memory in South Slavic post-Socialist contemporary art.


Jamie Summers

Art History, MA, 2016

I am interested in the ways images of women are used to communicate anxieties the of men during times of socio-political uncertainty, and how those images are utilized to propagate these anxieties with the intention of control or eradication. My research focuses on the fin-de-siècle, looking specifically at femme fatale imagery and its relationship to the changing political, scientific, and social climate leading up to World War I.


Krystle Kelley

Art History, MA, 2016

My research interests are in critical theories of art and cultural districts and tourism/consumerism and the intersection of public and private spheres, particularly in the consideration of education and social equity. I also work with the Visual Resources Center and Dr. Ariana Maki on a grant funded project using the image archive of Dr. Ronald Bernier (former CU professor and Himalayan art and architecture specialist), tracing and cataloging major art and architectural sites in the Himalaya region that are at risk and useful for further scholarship.


Morgan Butts

Art History, MA, 2016

I will be focusing on Latin American art for my thesis. My current research delves into imagery that relates to Pre-Columbian perceptions of death, sacrifice, and the afterlife in the Andes.


Mary Rose Williams

Art History, MA, 2016

My focus area is Medieval art. My current research explores the sculpture of the French Romanesque period.


Hope Fuchs

Art History, MA, 2016

My area of focus in art history is the Italian Renaissance and the Baroque. Specifically, I am studying sculpture, and am currently exploring the myth of the artist as genius using Bernini’s bozzetti as a case study. I hope to examine notions of spontaneity and the value of the artist’s touch while questioning contemporary beliefs regarding Renaissance art practice.


Chad Davis

Art History, MA, 2016

My research involves a semiotic approach to art within the colonial period from both Mesoamerica and Northern Europe. I am interested in the cross-cultural negotiations, alterations, power discrepancies, adaptations, and influences between the two varying sign systems in an attempt to discover new, heterogeneous interpretations and variants in the image.

 


Jade Gutierrez

Art History, MA, 2017

I am interested in colonial Latin America, especially the Andes, and the complex art forms that result from colonial hegemonic societies. I have recently been researching textile production in the Andes and how both indigenous and Spanish spirituality and religion manifest themselves in colonial clothing. I am also interested in memory, identity, and in the construction of meaning; especially in societies that have undergone extensive change or a traumatic event such as the Spanish Civil War and the colonization of the Americas.