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Art History: Nuestra Señora de los Remedios
Art History: Nuestra Señora de los Remedios

Visiting Scholar Program

The title of the Spring 2014 series is: Art/Religion/Materialities

A series of lectures on the ways that art and religion/cosmology intersect in the material realm, offering a wide variety of cultural and crosscultural perspectives on a topic currently of great interest to art historians, anthropologists, historians, religious studies scholars, and many others. This series is conceived to complement the CU Mediterranean Studies focus in 2013-14 on Religion.

All talks will take place in the British Studies Room, Norlin Library, at 5 pm

Complimentary coffee and tea will be served. All lectures are free and open to the public


Ruth Phillips – January 21
“Monstrances and Wampums: Jesuits, Iroquois and Materializations of the Spiritual in Seventeenth – Century America”

Ms. Phillips holds a Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Art and Culture and is Professor of Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. She is former Director of the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology. She received her PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her most recent book is Museum Pieces: Toward the Indigenization of Canadian Museums (2011). 

This lecture is Co-sponored with CUAM, Annual Lecture: Critical Positions: Perspectives on Art History, Curatorial Practice, and Art Criticism


Jae Emerling – February 4
“Rethinking Art History, Religion, and Materiality with Deleuze” 

Jae Emerling is an Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. He received his PhD from UCLA. His most recent book is Photography: History and Theory (2012).


Cynthia Hahn – February 20
“Capturing Fragments of the Divine: Histories of the Passion Relics”

Ms. Hahn is Professor of medieval Art at Hunter College and The Graduate Center CUNY. She received her PhD from Johns Hopkins University. Her most recent book is Strange Beauty: Issues in the Making and Meaning of Reliquaries from 400 to circa 1204 (2012).


Maria Evangelatou – March 4
“Transcending Boundaries: Art and Religious Experience in El Greco’s Mediterranean Journey”

Ms. Evangelatou is Assistant Professor of Byzantine Art at the University of California at Santa Cruz. She received her PhD. from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. She also holds a degree in Museology and Conservation of Works of Art from the Universita Internationale dell’Arte in Florence and has published widely on Byzantine art. She is currently writing a book on El Greco.


Thomas Cummins – March 18
“Miraculous Cuzco: The Contentious Nature of Buildings and Paintings created after the  Earthquake of 1650” 

Mr. Cummins is Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art at Harvard University, where he is also Chair of the Department of the History of Art and Architecture. He received his PhD. from UCLA.


Helen Hills – April 8
“The Matter of Miracles: Architecture and the Sacred in Baroque Italy”

Ms. Hills is Professor of the History of Art at the University of York, U.K. She received her PhD. from the Courtauld Institute, University of London. Her most recent book is New Approaches to Naples: The Power of Place, co-edited with Melissa Calaresu (2013).


The Visiting Scholar Program is organized to explore the discipline of art history—its cultural connections, its methodological pursuits, and its changing nature—by focusing extensively on the research and insights of individual academic experts. Three to five highly regarded art historians and/or art critics speak at a public lecture presenting current research and published papers. During their week long visit they work closely with graduate students enrolled in the visiting scholar seminar class.


Past participants of this program include:

  • Nina M. Athanassoglou-Kallmyer (University of Delaware)
  • Tim Barringer - “Broken Pastoral and the English Folk”
  • Bettina Bergmann (Mount Holyoke)
  • Irene Bierman (UCLA)
  • Suzanne Preston Blier (Harvard University)
  • Kathleen Weil-Garris Brandt (NYU)
  • Norman Bryson (Harvard University)
  • Sarah Burns
  • Michael Camille (University of Chicago)
  • Stephen Campbell – “Andrea Mantegna: Force and the Frame”
  • Annemarie Weyl-Carr (Southern Methodist University)
  • Anna Chave (CUNY)
  • John R. Clark (University of Texas)
  • Michael Cole (Columbia University)
  • Brad Collins (University of South Carolina)
  • Paul Crenshaw (Washington University, St. Louis)
  • Joanne Cubbs (Indianapolis Museum of Art)
  • Neil Cummings (Chelsea School of Art, U. of London)
  • Anthony Cutler (Penn State University)
  • Thomas E.A. Dale (University of Wisconsin)
  • Erika Doss – “Cultural Vandalism and Public Memory: Anger, Citizenship, and Memorials in Contemporary America”
  • James Elkins (Art Institute, Chicago)
  • Ilene Forsyth (University of Michigan)
  • Michael Fried (Johns Hopkins University)
  • Elaine K. Gazda (University of Michigan)
  • Heidi Gearhart
  • Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby (UC, Berkeley)
  • Jeffrey Hamburger (Harvard University)
  • Sharon Hirsch (Dickinson College)
  • Wu Hung – ” Engaging the Real: The Three Gorges Dam and Contemporary Chinese Art”
  • Amelia Jones (McGill University)
  • Joan Kee – “Ming Wong’s Cultural Studies”
  • Martin Kemp (Oxford University)
  • Donald Kuspit
  • Ann Kuttner (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Dana Leibsohn (Smith College)
  • Amy Lyford (Occidental College)
  • Lyle Massey (University of California, Irvine)
  • Gerardo Mosquera
  • David Morgan (Duke University)
  • Keith Moxey (Barnard College, Columbia University)
  • Lawrence Nees (University of Delaware)
  • Carol Ockman (Williams College)
  • Mary Pardo (UNC, Chapel Hill)
  • Donna Pierce (Denver Art Museum)
  • Griselda Pollock
  • Martin Powers (University of Michigan)
  • Donald Preziosi (UCLA)
  • Sally Promey (Yale University)
  • Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (independent, artist)
  • Jerome Silbergeld - “Chinese Photography: Documentation as Art”
  • Pamela Smith (Columbia University)
  • Catherine B. Soussloff (UBC, Vancouver)
  • Barbara Stafford (University of Chicago)
  • David Summers (University of Virginia)
  • Joyce Szabo (University of New Mexico)
  • Ellen Wiley Todd (George Mason University)
  • Richard Vinograd (Stanford University)
  • Anne Wagner (University of California, Berkeley)
  • William E. Wallace (Washington University, St. Louis)
  • Thomas Ybarro-Frausto
  • Robert Zwijnenberg (University of Leiden)